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Seven Surprising Things you can do to Boost your Immunity

30/06/2016

seven-surprising-things-you-can-do-to-boost-your-immunity

By Expert Tips, as featured on the Motherpedia website, posted date June 23, 2016.

How to Build your Resilience All Year Round

When winter approaches, many of us start thinking about ways to boost our immunity for the cold and flu season ahead. The trouble is it can often be too late by then, and the best we can hope to do is reduce the symptoms we’re already suffering. A better approach is to aim to keep our immune system strong throughout the year so that we’re not as vulnerable to illness when the seasons change.

Follow these tips to increase your immunity not just in winter, but all year round.

1. Sweat regularly

Exercise boosts your heart rate, which helps to remove toxins from the body and improve circulation of immunity boosting white blood cells. Aim for moderate physical activity on most – preferably all – days of the week to reap the health benefits. Not a fan of sweating it out in the gym? Not a problem – even a brisk walk is better than nothing.

2. Swap sugary snacks for fruit

Craving a chocolate bar or a piece of cake? When you have a hankering for something sweet, choose a vitamin C-rich piece of fruit instead, such as an orange, grapefruit or even a pineapple. The sweetness of the fruit will give your body the pick-me- up it needs and the vitamin C and antioxidants will help to support your immune system, leaving you less susceptibel to colds and flu.

3. Try Olive leaf Extract

Fresh-picked olive leaf extract is a powerful antioxidant. It’s known for its capacity to combat free radicals that tend to weaken our immune system, making us more susceptible to catching cold and flu. Fresh-Picked™ Olive Leaf Extract is traditionally used in Herbal Medicine to support the immune system and general wellbeing.

4. Make your own bone broth

Bone broth is amazing for gut health and is rich in antioxidants, which help boost the immune system by fighting toxins. It’s super easy to make at home – simply search for a recipe online. It’s also an excellent way to use any left over roast chicken bones that you would normally throw out. Bone broth will also help to keep your hair, skin and nails shiny and strong. What’s not to like?

5. Go outside

Vitamin D helps to regulate the body’s levels of calcium and phosphorus, which are essential minerals needed for bone and teeth development. It also assists with healthy immune function, helping to stave off diseases and speeding up recovery. Vitamin D can be taken as a supplement or found in some foods, but the easiest way to boost your body’s vitamin D levels is to spend around ten minutes in the sunshine every day. Aim for the morning or late afternoon to avoid damagin UV rays.

6. Let go of stress

It may be easier said than done, but managing stress is crucial for a strong immune system. Tension and stress wreak havoc on the body and may result in symptoms such as weight gain and even cardiovascular disease. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, try taking a walk in the fresh air or practice meditative breathing techniques. Whenever you can, try to leave your work at work and don’t check or reply to emails once you leave the office.

7. Have more fun

Laughter helps you to relax, reduces your stress levels, and leaves you feeling happier and more optimistic – and all of those things contribute to a strong immune system. If you’re starting to feel burnt out, don’t forget to schedule time for fun activities such hobbies, favourite sporting activities, or catch-ups with family and friends. A nice dinner with people you love can do wonders for your state of mind and leave you feeling relaxed and refreshed.

About the Expert: Olive Leaf Extract, derived from the fresh-picked leaves of the olive tree, could be your secret weapon to help build a strong front-line winter defence. Olive Leaf Extract is traditionally used to support the immune system and relieve symptoms of coughs, colds, & flus, sore throats and upper respiratory tract infections.


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